What are the effects of the war in Afghanistan?

When did the US start the war in Afghanistan?

The War in Afghanistan began in 2001 after the September 11 attacks and has lasted for more than 19 years, making it the longest conflict in which the United States has been involved. 0 years 20 years 10

What was the result of the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan?

The world experienced a bumpy ride in the final years of the Cold War, with post-Vietnam détente, the Star Wars rhetoric of the US, the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan and the collapse of communism. In addition to the development of new nuclear missiles, the Cold War escalated further when the USSR invaded Afghanistan.

What are the effects of the war in Afghanistan?

War in Afghanistan and its Effects on November 18, 2020 World News KABUL, Afghanistan — For the past 40 years, Afghanistan experienced unrest from the Soviet invasion to the various violent terrorist groups that control the country. After the attacks of 9/11, the U.S. invaded the country, which brought an end to the Taliban rule.

What did the US do to help Afghanistan?

With the help of NATO countries such as USA and France who were major stakeholders, several new medical facilities were built, and Afghan females were educated and trained to fight back diseases and other problems.

Why did the US go to Afghanistan in the first place?

The invasion, led by US forces with help from NATO allies, was framed specifically as a step in a war on terrorism.

What was the cost of the war in Afghanistan?

According to U.S. geologists, the cost of Afghanistan’s mineral resources is 1 trillion USD, but Afghanistan government claims that the country’s mineral resources are no less than 3 trillion USD. War has been a hinder to Afghanistan’s development and made it one of the world’s poorest countries.

How many US soldiers have died in Afghanistan?

Since the war against the Taliban began in 2001, US forces have suffered more than 2,300 deaths and around 20,660 soldiers injured in action. But US casualty figures are dwarfed by the loss of life among Afghan security forces and civilians.

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